Colorado Maintenance (Alimony) Threshold Test

Before a court even gets into the new Colorado spousal maintenance (alimony) guidelines previously discussed, a threshold test is applied. There are two prongs of the “threshold test” under C.R.S. 14-10-114.

Sufficient Property

First, the court must find that a spouse lacks sufficient property to provide for his or her reasonable needs. This means that a court must divide property in the divorce before turning to the issue of maintenance. If a spouse is awarded an income-producing asset, such as a rental property, they are less likely to need maintenance/alimony from the other party. However, a spouse is not required to sell or consume property awarded to them before being entitled to maintenance.

What does “reasonable needs” mean? It depends on the particular circumstances of each case – an inherently squishy and debatable concept. The standard of living established during the marriage is a relevant factor. A marriage where frequent travel and fine-dining were enjoyed is different than a spartan one. The reasonable needs will be based on the present circumstances at the time of the hearing rather than the past or future conditions.

Spousal maintenance is to provide the means to obtain food, clothing, habitation and other necessities. Colorado courts have taken a fairly expansive view of “reasonable needs,” and stated that it does not mean the minimum requirements to sustain life. Nevertheless, a court is not required to ensure spouses have an equal lifestyle forever.

The totality of the parties’ financial circumstances will also be considered. If a spouse is the beneficiary of a trust, that may be considered even though the trust is not “property” under Colorado law. The reasoning behind this rule is easy to understand – a party doesn’t need maintenance/alimony if they’ll be perfectly fine on their own.

Appropriate Employment

If property awarded to a spouse is insufficient to provide for their reasonable needs, the court will move on to the second part of the threshold test: employment. A person won’t need maintenance/alimony if he or she can support themselves on their own. Again, each case is different.

The court will determine what is “appropriate employment” for a spouse requesting an award of maintenance. The expectations and intentions established during the marriage will be considered along with the age, education, work history, health and of the requesting spouse. A court will also take into account if a person is voluntarily underemployed or completely unemployed. A famous Colorado divorce case (In re the Marriage of Elmer) involved an attorney that voluntarily quit practicing law and decided to pick apples at $10/hour. The court imputed income to that party based on his higher earning capacity.

The above is a brief summary concerning Colorado’s “threshold test” for awarding maintenance/alimony in a divorce. There are a number of other factors that a court will consider in a Colorado divorce where a party is requesting spousal maintenance. Those factors will be discussed in upcoming posts.

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