Voluntary Unemployment for Colorado Family Law

Voluntary unemployment is when an award of spousal maintenance or child support is based on imputed income that is not actually being earned by a parent or former spouse. The same concept applies whether the person is completely unemployed or working below their true earning capacity, i.e. “underemployed.” Voluntary unemployment frequently comes up in Colorado divorces where maintenance is at issue or any case involving child support.

Both parents are obligated to support their children. If one parent isn’t earning as much as they could, the child suffers. A party may lack the initiative to find or keep work. They may be purposefully turning down work to spite the other party. Whatever the reason, they are shirking their obligation to support the child. The policy of spousal support vis-a-vis maintenance (alimony) is no different.

The dispute comes down to (a) whether a parent is making less than what they should be, and (b) what is the potential income for the parent. A few examples may help.

  • In re Marriage of Bregar – court imputed income to former lawyer who had started a cattle ranch.
  • In re Marriage of Yates – imputed income based on former pay rate when father was involuntarily terminated from job, but turned down jobs that required travel.
  • In re Marriage of Elmer – licensed attorney imputed income because he decided to pick apples at $10/hour.
  • In re Marriage of Zisch – mother with teaching certificate was imputed income even though she testified that she was actively looking for a full-time teaching position.

Exceptions

Under Colorado law, there are a few notable situations where a court cannot impute income based on a parent or former spouse being unemployed. These exceptions are listed below:

  1. A party is physically or mentally incapacitated.
  2. A parent is caring for a child under the age of 30 months.
  3. A parent that is in prison for 1+ years.

Similarly, a party will not be underemployed if:

  1. They’re working in a position that is temporary and reasonably intended to result in higher income in the foreseeable future; or
  2. They’re job is a good faith career move that isn’t intended to deprive the other party of child support. The lower position cannot unreasonably reduce the support available to a child; or
  3. They’re in an education program that will likely result in higher income within a reasonable period of time.

Calculating Imputed Income

As previously discussed, Colorado law is fairly specific in determining a party’s income. How should a court calculate income when a party is unemployed or underemployed? Case law suggests that a court can use past earnings, education level, or wages of an average person with similar qualifications in finding the appropriate amount of income for calculating child support or maintenance.

Colorado divorce attorneys have multiple arrows in their quiver when handling a case involving allegations of underemployment or unemployment. Using employment statistics from the department of labor or formal discovery requests can break a case. Familiarity with the judge presiding over the case will drive the strategy behind the presentation of evidence and line of argument.

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