How to Attack a Colorado Prenup

Previously we went over the general requirements for a prenuptial agreement in Colorado. There are some important changes to Colorado law on prenups coming next week, but we’ll first discuss the ways a prenup agreement may be invalidated. These concepts apply to both prenups and agreements made after people are married.

Change in Circumstances

Although nearly impossible, a spouse seeking to attack the validity of a Colorado prenup may successfully argue that a change in circumstances justifies a court finding that the state’s interest in the welfare of a divorced spouse outweighs the freedom to contract. A court may consider factors such as (a) whether there are children, (b) the length of the marriage and (c) if there was a detrimental reliance on the marriage. But a person considering a Colorado prenup should never assume that a change of circumstances will allow them to wiggle out of an otherwise valid agreement.

Violation of Public Policy

Similar to a change of circumstances, there are several topics where the sanctity of contract will be overridden by Colorado public policy. For example, a provision on child support or religious training for children will be invalidated by a Colorado court. Moreover, agreements where a party waives spousal maintenance or attorneys’ fees may be unenforceable if it would be “unconscionable” under Newman v. Newman and In re Marriage of Ikeler, respectively. Whether a provision is unconscionable is determined at the time of the Colorado divorce.

Fraud, Duress or Undue Influence

A contract must be agreed to voluntarily. The same principle applies to a Colorado prenup. If a person is forced into signing a prenup, it will be unenforceable. Factors such as the time between the execution of the prenup and the wedding, or whether Colorado lawyers are involved will be relevant. But the threat of calling off the wedding is not enough for duress or to invalidate a prenup.

Lack of Disclosure and Independent Counsel

Parties to a Colorado prenup need to disclose their financial circumstances. However, there isn’t a bright-line rule on what is sufficient disclosure for a binding prenup. And as referenced above, lack of independent counsel may be considered when a court evaluates whether parties voluntarily and knowingly entered into the agreement. The best practice is for a party negotiating a prenup to (a) hire a Colorado lawyer, and (b) produce as much detail about their finances as possible. Those details should include bank, mortgage and investment statements,  copies of pay stubs, appraisals for businesses or real estate and information about any contingent or prospective assets such as trusts or inheritances.

Coming soon is a post about the new changes to the Premarital and Marital Agreement Act in Colorado.

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